All posts by Chris Chapman

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Old Main Village Marks Its Milestone 30-Year Anniversary

WHAT

Old Main Village, a premier senior living community in Mankato, is celebrating its 30th anniversary on Friday, September 28.

*Your reporter is invited to come cover the celebration
and get interviews (see opportunities below)*

WHY

The Mankato community is invited to come and celebrate Old Main Village’s grand milestone. For decades, Old Main Village has provided care for hundreds of residents from Mankato and surrounding areas. Built in 1924, the Old Main Village building was part of the original campus for Minnesota State University-Mankato. The Old Main Village building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and offers residents 73 apartments, a heated indoor pool and spa, cultural and educational programming, a 225 person capacity dining room, and more.

WHEN

Friday, September 28, 2018
5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

WHERE

Old Main Village
301 South 5th Street
Mankato, MN 56001
Event to take place in the Heritage Dining Room

PHOTO & INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES

Holly Schoettler, Executive Director, Old Main Village

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Old Main Village Receives 2017 Bronze National Quality Award

Bronze-Level Award Honors Senior Living Organizations’ Commitment to Quality Services 

MANKATO, Minn. (June 1, 2017) – Yesterday, Old Main Village was recognized as a 2017 recipient of the Bronze – Commitment to Quality Award by the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL). The award is the first of three distinctions possible through the AHCA/NCAL National Quality Award Program, which honors long term and post-acute care providers that have demonstrated their commitment to improving the quality of senior care. Old Main Village is the only senior living community in Mankato to receive the 2017 Bronze Award.

“Bronze award recipients advance our mission of improving lives by delivering solutions for quality care,” said Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of AHCA/NCAL. “We applaud their efforts to enrich the lives of those in the long term and post-acute care communities we serve.”

Implemented by AHCA/NCAL in 1996, the National Quality Award Program is centered on the core values and criteria of the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The program assists providers of long term and post-acute care services in achieving their performance excellence goals.

The program has three levels: Bronze, Silver, and Gold. Facilities begin the quality improvement process at the Bronze level, where they develop an organizational profile with essential performance elements such as vision and mission statements and an assessment of customers’ expectations. Bronze applicants must demonstrate their ability to implement a performance improvement system. A team of trained Examiners reviews each Bronze application to determine if the facility has met the demands of the criteria. As a recipient of the Bronze – Commitment to Quality award, Old Main Village may now move forward in developing approaches and achieving performance levels that meet the criteria required for the Silver – Achievement in Quality award.

The Association will announce the 2017 Silver – Achievement in Quality and Gold – Excellence in Quality Award recipients in the coming months. The awards will be presented during AHCA/NCAL’s 68th Annual Convention and Exposition in Las Vegas, Nevada, October 15-18, 2017.

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KEYC-TV and Mankato Free Press Cover Old Main Village’s and Kato Public School’s Art Program

 


Click image to view article

Eight 7th grade students from Kato Public Charter School and eight senior residents from Old Main Village senior living community are partaking in a special six-week relationship-building experience. Each student-senior pair will create a stained, glazed and fired ceramic bowl.

Artist Michelle Kaisersatt will lead the pottery program. Her passion for building intergenerational relationships goes hand-in-hand with the senior living community’s mission. Michelle works to cross-generational bridges and alter the fabric of a community in a positive way through art. Old Main Village has a longstanding tradition, with its Ages Entwined program, in providing regular opportunities for sharing and learning between young and old.

Working with clay itself has surprising benefits. Not only does it boost brain health by encouraging creativity for all ages, but it is therapeutic, and helps increase self-esteem and a sense of pride in accomplishment. Playing with clay helps stimulate the mind and creates a soothing effect, which can be helpful for seniors who experience stiffness with arthritis, and children developing fine motor skills.

At the end of the six-week experience, Old Main Village will hold a reception for the students, their families, and the seniors to celebrate and display their pieces.

The exhibit will travel to the Blue Earth County Library for public display during the month of May.This activity is made possible by a grant provided by the Prairie Lakes Regional Arts Council from funds appropriated by the Minnesota State Legislature.

Classes:
March 22, 29 & April 5, 12, 19, 26
3:15-4:45 p.m.
(contact Denise Gustafson or Lauren Dosland for the activities taking place during each class)

Reception:
April 30 at Old Main Village
2:00-4:00 p.m.

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Creating Intergenerational Relationships Through Art

Old Main Village and Kato Public Charter School Partner for pottery program

MANKATO, Minn. (March 14, 2017) – Eight 7th grade students from Kato Public Charter School and eight senior residents from Old Main Village senior living community will partake in a special six-week relationship-building art experience. By the end of the six-week program, each student-senior pair will have created a stained, glazed and fired ceramic bowl.

“We are excited to said Denise Gustafson, Director of Intergenerational Programs at The Goodman Group, which manages Old Main Village.

Artist Michelle Kaisersatt will lead the pottery program. Her passion for building intergenerational relationships goes hand-in-hand with the senior living community’s mission. Michelle works to cross-generational bridges and alter the fabric of a community in a positive way through art. Old Main Village has a longstanding tradition, with its Ages Entwined program, in providing regular opportunities for sharing and learning between young and old.

Working with clay itself has surprising benefits. Not only does it boost brain health by encouraging creativity for all ages, but it is therapeutic, and helps increase self-esteem and a sense of pride in accomplishment. Playing with clay helps stimulate the mind and creates a soothing effect, which can be helpful for seniors who experience stiffness with arthritis, and children developing fine motor skills.

At the end of the six-week experience, Old Main Village will hold a reception for the students, their families, and the seniors to celebrate and display their pieces.

The exhibit will travel to the Blue Earth County Library for public display during the month of May. This activity is made possible by a grant provided by the Prairie Lakes Regional Arts Council from funds appropriated by the Minnesota State Legislature.

WHEN:

Classes:
March 22, 29 & April 5, 12, 19, 26
3:15-4:45 p.m.

(contact Denise Gustafson or Lauren Dosland for the activities taking place during each class)

Reception: April 30 at Old Main Village
2:00-4:00 p.m.

WHERE:

All classes will take place at Old Main Village. The only exception is March 29, when the participants will create their bowl on the potter wheel at Kato Public Charter School.

Old Main Village
301 South 5th Street
Mankato, MN 56001

Kato Public Charter School
110 N 6th Street
Mankato, MN 56001

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Holiday Wedding Wishes Come True at Historic Old Main Village Community in Mankato

Holly Resner, executive director of Old Main Village, which offers independent and an assisted living for seniors in the greater Mankato area, truly takes her work and life to heart. It was clear from the start when Holly joined Old Main Village in August 2013 that she loves her job and chosen career path of working with older adults. She considers Old Main Village her home. Holly is proud of her staff and says the residents are family. Soon after her fiancé Chuck Schoettler proposed to her, she told him that Old Main Village is where she wanted to have their wedding so the residents could be part of this special day in her life. She always dreamed of a Christmas wedding, so the event is planned for December 20, a day before her birthday, at the height of the holiday season.

She loves the history and beauty of the building and during the holidays, the public areas are adorned with lovely holiday decorations. The building’s history in the state is significant, known as being part of the original campus at Minnesota State University – Mankato (MSU-M), dating back (fill in number) years. The building is on the National Register of Historic Sites and has functioned as a senior living community for more than 25 years. No two apartments are alike in the building, and many of the residents have ties to MSU-M, either as faculty or through family. She herself is an MSU-M grad. One resident actually lives in her old classroom – in that her apartment is located in the same place she used to teach! The building features extensive brick work, pillars, arches, (type?) woodwork and large windows in many of the main public gathering areas, and wall-to-wall windows reach apartment ceilings, offering views of Mankato.

The Heritage Dining Room, the two-story venue for her ceremony and reception, features an elegant dining room space used for hosting special events, with natural lighting streaming in from the large arched windows surrounding the room. They will exchange their vows on the mezzanine balcony, between the dining area and upstairs club room, where residents can easily overlook the proceedings. Holly will be wearing a heavy satin, deep cream colored A-Line dress, decorated with embellished lace and beading in a deeper shade of cream. The wedding party will be wearing red and black to go with the holiday theme. Keith, Old Main Village’s Dining Services Manager, and staff, will be preparing the wedding meal for family and wedding guests. Her future sister-in-law will be singing at the ceremony, and she will be walking down the aisle to the song “God Bless the Broken Road” by Rascal Flatts, which she says perfectly describes their life and love.

This is a second marriage for both Holly and her fiancé Chuck Schoettler, a retired meter technician from Xcel Energy. Chuck proposed to her during a surprise trip she planned for them to the Old Log Theater in Excelsior, Minn. During dinner, Chuck surprised her by getting down on one knee in front of everyone as onlookers stood and cheered. Finding love a second time round also makes this wedding extra special. Between the two of them, they have eight kids and 7 grand kids.

Old Main Village is managed by The Goodman Group, a leading national senior living and health care company, based in Chaska, Minn. Holly was aware of the senior living community due to her work with Rasmussen College and her background in the industry. Holly says, “Assisted Living is HOME; it’s where my heart is and has always belonged. The residents make my life so full of purpose and meaning. It is a privilege to work in their home each and every day, and to do my part to ensure that they receive the best quality of life possible. They were very happy to be asked to be part of the day, and love Chuck almost as much as I do! There is no way I would celebrate this special moment in my life and not have them there.”

Holly is looking forward to this special day, accompanied by close friends, relatives and extended community family.

Additional Background: Yours, Mine and Ours

Holly’s family: She has a son that is almost 22 years old graduating from Rasmussen College in December with a Bachelor’s of Science degree in Information Systems Management; a 19 year-old daughter attending Luther College in Decorah, Iowa; and a 16 year-old daughter, who is a junior at Mankato West High School.

Chuck’s family: He has a 35 year-old daughter that is a Physical Therapy assistant at the Veteran’s Home in Minneapolis, and a 33 year-old daughter in Human Resources for a law firm who is a 30-year cancer survivor and survived the same cancer that ultimately took her younger brother at the age of 4. He also has a 31 year-old son, who is an area manager for Valvoline Oil; and a 26 year-old son who is in medical school at the University of Minnesota. Chuck has seven grandchildren.   Chuck also has a 23 year old son that drives over the road semi trucks for a living.

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Twisted Stitchers at Old Main Village

The Twisted Stitchers are a small but lively group of women residents at Old Main Village senior living community that have joined forces to wield their mighty knitting needles to help those in the Greater Mankato area in need. Though their knitting experience varies, and some also sew, they welcome all residents to join to the craft to purl, cable, rib, block and gauge. The craft of knitting offers a relaxing, therapeutic, stress-relieving break from today’s high-tech world. The Twisted Stitchers enjoy socializing and joking a bit while working (thus the name), yet they rarely drop a stitch while knitting warm clothing and bedding accessories to help women and their kids in the area seeking help from CADA, the Committee Against Domestic Abuse.

The idea to form the social group came about a year ago to resident Janet Kiehm when she hosted an open house in her apartment shortly after moving to Old Main Village, which provides independent and assisted living options in downtown Mankato. Old Main Village is managed by The Goodman Group, based in Minnesota.

During an open house, when guests were discussing what they like to do, residents Janet and Kathleen Maury suggested that perhaps they could meet once a week and form some sort of social sewing or knitting club. Both Janet and her daughter, who is a nurse anesthetist in the area, are long-time supporters of CADA. When looking for a charity to help, Janet suggested they knit and donate items to help the women and kids who rely on CADA’s shelter and support during times of crisis. According to CADA’s Shelter Team Lead Melissa Ballman, they provide the only emergency safety shelter for women and their children experiencing domestic and sexual violence throughout South Central Minnesota. The average stay at the shelter is two to three months. They also provide support groups, therapeutic counseling, community education and training opportunities, and supervised parenting time to ensure the safety of children when seeing a non-custodial parent.

The Twisted Stitchers knit stocking caps, ear warmers, mittens and slippers of all sizes for adults and kids for the CADA shelter in Mankato. One of their group members, Barb, creates pillows. They manage to knit at a good pace but want to encourage other knitters in the community to pick up their knitting needles and knit donations or donate yarn to their group so they can make more items for CADA. Janet notes that 3-ply worsted wool yarn seems to works the best for knitting warm and sturdy items. The Goodman Group, which manages Old Main Village, is hosting a yarn drive at the community and corporate office through (date) to help provide yarn for the Twisted Sticthers to make more items for CADA. Whether you want to learn or are a beginner, intermediate or advanced knitter, the Twisted Stitchers invite you to help make a difference.

Please email Janet Kiehm at jckiehm@yahoo.com if you would also like to contribute funds for the few out-of-pocket expenses and/or materials needed for the project to help the Twisted Sticthers help CADA. You can also contact Lindsay Bolstad at CADA at lindsayb@cadaMN.org or 507-625-8688 ext. 100 if you would like to donate items the women’s shelter needs, or contact Bridget Bruels at bridgetb@cadaMN.org or 507-625-8688 ext. 123 to learn more about volunteer opportunities.”

Over the years, CADA applied for and received grants to open satellite offices in the region as well as expanding programming in Mankato. Funding for these programs was cut when the State had the $4.5 billion budget shortfall, so they rearranged their approach to serving the locations. CADA’s main office, shelter and visitation center are located in Mankato, and they have outreach/satellite offices in New Ulm, Gaylord, Waseca, Blue Earth, St. James and Mankato. They noticed that as they became more local to the victims in the region, that the number of people seeking help greatly increased. They note that this attests to the importance of these local programs. During the expansion of services, CADA also received a grant from the Blandin Foundation to open the Keep Me Safe Visitation and Exchange program. This program provides supervised visitations and exchanges in a neutral setting for noncustodial parents.

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Mankato Senior Living Community to Produce Intergenerational Play, Strengthen Connections Between Generations

MANKATO, Minn. (Aug. 16, 2016) – Old Main Village is partnering for the first year with Missoula Children’s Theatre (MCT) to host a one-week multi-generational summer theatre camp August 15-20 which will result in the presentation of two performances of “Peter & Wendy.” The intergenerational summer theatre camp experience is being made possible by the senior living community’s Ages Enwtined program, which helps bring generations together to create meaningful interactions, and offers opportunities for sharing wisdom, mentoring and socializing. The oldest resident participating is 92 years old, and the youngest child is 7 years old.

Casting for “Peter & Wendy” will include school age students from the community entering first grade through 12th grade and senior residents from The Village Senior Residence. Together, The Village Senior Residence and Missoula Children’s Theatre will transcend cultural barriers between the young and young at heart by actively engaging them in the arts. Participating in theatre helps to develop confidence, skills and self-esteem, as well as meaningful relationships.

WHEN:
REHEARSALS
Mon., Aug. 15, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Tues. – Fri., Aug 16-19, 1:00-5:30 p.m.

PERFORMANCES
Fri., Aug. 19, 6:30 p.m.
Sat., Aug. 20, 3:00 p.m.

“We are excited to join forces with Missoula Children’s Theatre for this special event,” said Holly Schoettler, executive director of Old Main Village. “Our senior residents and the children in the community are really looking forward to the performance. We see that both generations benefit from the interaction, and the children develop confidence, skills and self-esteem, as well as meaningful relationships with our residents.”

“We are thrilled to join forces with Old Main Village to develop an exceptional intergenerational theatre program experience for school age children and seniors,” said Michael McGill, executive director, MCT. “We understand this supports the senior living community’s intergenerational initiatives, providing enriching, intergenerational experiences for all those involved and entertainment for the local community.

Tickets: Admission is free.

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Mankato Resident Helen Erickson Hits 100 Year-Old Milestone

MANKATO, Minn. (April 23, 2015) – Helen Erickson, a resident of Old Main Village, managed by The Goodman Group, will become part of an exclusive, but growing group of people as she reaches her 100-year birthday milestone in April. The milestone will be celebrated at the monthly resident birthday party on Thurs., April 23 at 2:30 pm in the Club Room at Old Main Village. There are seven residents celebrating their birthdays in April (the next most senior resident celebrant is turning 98). Helen is a life-long resident of Mankato.

Helen will also be recognized on her actual birthdate, Sat., April 27, when her family from Minnesota, Florida and Washington gather. There will be a special cake made by Helen’s granddaughter to enjoy as they celebrate this momentous occasion.

Among Helen’s many birthday celebrations, her favorite birthday memory was when she turned 12 years old in 1927. Her mother threw a big party and made a birthday cake and hid a dime in it, which “was a big thing in those days,” noted Helen. She remembers playing the timeless games of Telephone and Grandma’s Trunk at the party. One of Helen’s earliest memories iswhen her brother was born. At the young age of 5, in her eagerness to help, she stood on the oven door to cook for her mom.

“Be yourself, help others, and enjoy everything you do,” said Helen. These words of wisdom are the secret to Helen’s longevity. While she admits that genes have their own part to play, she hopes to share with her family and friends that the way you live makes a difference also.

Helen remembers when Mankato’s streets were all dirt roads. She attended all of the old local schools here in Mankato, including the Union school, which opened in 1867 and closed in 1975. It is now the Union Park office building. The school taught all grades, with a range of subjects from basic reading to engineering. After graduating high school, she attended and graduated from Mankato State Teachers College, which is now Minnesota State University Mankato, and even had class in what is now Old Main Village! With a degree in education, Helenbegan her first job at a small country school in Eagle Lake, Minn.

Helen was married for 67 years when her husband, Arnold, passed away 11 years ago. Arnold was from Rapidan, a few miles southwest of Mankato, and worked at the Rapidan Dam power plant. Together they had five children, and the family has grown to include 14 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. She is not the only long-lived member in her family. Her brother is still living and doing well at the age of 95. Among her favorite hobbies are reading, especially the newspaper, crochet and knitting, walking, and gardening. She enjoys tending to her beautiful garden plot at Old Main Village.

“Helen loves to participate in any and all activities that we have at Old Main Village,” said Holly Schoettler, executive director, Old Main Village. “She is always happy and enthusiastic and really sets the tone for others to follow. To have someone that remembers everything from 10 minutes ago to 50 years ago, and is so full of life and laughter, is what sets Helen apart. It is truly a privilege to know her and I hope when I am 100 years old I am just as feisty!”

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Old Main Village in Mankato, Minn., Receives National Award for Commitment to Quality Services

Bronze-Level Award Honors Long Term Care Organizations

MANKATO, Minn., (Sept. 12, 2011) – Old Main Village has been recognized as a 2011 recipient of the Bronze – Commitment to Quality National Quality Award for its outstanding performance in the health care profession. The award, presented by the American Health Care Association and National Center for Assisted Living (AHCA/NCAL), highlights facilities across the nation that have demonstrated their intention to pursue a rigorous quality improvement system.

“This award signifies a great commitment to quality care and an important step in raising the standards of sustainable, person-centered care and services,” says Governor Mark Parkinson, President and CEO of AHCA/NCAL. “We congratulate Old Main Village on this achievement.”

Implemented by AHCA/NCAL in 1996, the National Quality Award Program is centered on the core values and criteria of the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The program assists providers of long term and post-acute care services in achieving their performance excellence goals.

The program has three levels: Bronze, Silver, and Gold. Facilities begin the quality improvement process at the Bronze level, where they develop an organizational profile with essential performance elements such as vision and mission statements and an assessment of customers’ expectations. Bronze applicants must demonstrate their ability to implement a performance improvement system. A team of trained Examiners reviews each Bronze application to determine if the facility has met the demands of the criteria. As a recipient of the Bronze – Commitment to Quality award, Old Main Village may now move forward in developing approaches and achieving performance levels that meet the criteria required for the Silver – Achievement in Quality award.

“The recipients of the quality awards exemplify the energy and dedication required to advance quality care to the next level,” says Chick Stepahin, Chair, AHCA/NCAL National Quality Award Board of Overseers. “Improving quality care is an evolutionary cycle, and these facilities are the forerunners of the movement.”

The awards are sponsored by AHCA/NCAL Associate Business Member My InnerView, a Web-based applied research and quality-management company that supports leaders across the entire assisted living, senior housing and skilled nursing profession with tools to measure, benchmark and improve performance. Old Main Village was one of 14 Minnesota facilities to receive the Bronze level award. The award will be presented to Old Main Village during AHCA/NCAL’s 62nd Annual Convention and Exposition, September 18-21, 2011 in Las Vegas, Nev.

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Local WWII Vets to Fly to Washington D.C.

Four Old Main Village veterans honored for their service

MANKATO, Minn., (Sept. 27, 2011) – More than six decades after World War II (WWII) ended, four local veterans will be honored for their service as they take part in a national program known as Honor Flight. Arnie Wiens, Lee Asche, Lois Reed, and Ethel Frost, all residents of Mankato’s Old Main Village Senior Living Community, will take a one day trip to Washington, D.C. to see the memorial dedicated to them and their fellow servicemen.

These four, along with over a hundred other WWII veterans from Southern Minnesota will leave the Rochester airport in the wee morning hours of October 8th, escorted by 70 volunteers, including doctors and paramedics, to ensure everyone’s safety. They’ll be treated like royalty throughout the day and return back to Southern Minnesota late that evening.

The WWII memorial in Washington, D.C. was completed in May 2004 and was built to honor the men and women who served. Although individual trips to the memorial were not financially feasible for most, a one day trip is funded by donations to thank the veterans for their service. Honor Flight began by flying a few veterans to Washington, D.C. and later expanded to more than 80 cities with Honor Flight hubs. The hub located in Southeast Minnesota has allowed 913 veterans to visit their memorial.

Honoring veterans is nothing new at Old Main Village. They have a Veteran’s Club that meets monthly and annual events to observe Memorial Day and Veteran’s Day. Another Old Main Village resident, Robert Pulis, took part in Honor Flight back in May, with one of his sons serving as a volunteer escort for the day. After they returned, they gave a presentation of the event and that was what it took to inspire the Old Main Village’s Life Enrichment Director, Jackie Lupkes, to assist other veterans interested in the program. After the paperwork was filled out and a few phone calls and emails were exchanged, these four were notified of the honor.

As they prepare for the trip, these four veterans know this flight will be much different than those they took in the service. As we approach Veteran’s Day, let us remember and celebrate all veterans, but especially Mr. Wiens who served in the Army, Mr. Asche in the Navy, Ms. Reed in the Coast Guard, and Ms. Frost in the Army Air Corps. Thanks to all who support Honor Flight and may they have a wonderful trip.

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